Look Up And Neck

A gesture as simple as looking up performed continuously or holding it longer than due may result in neck injuries. We do this on a regular basis if we have a TV or a screen above eye level or if we have a profession such as a painter or electrician. Let’s explain.

The cervical vertebrae are placed one on top of the other like a tower of cubes. They are held together by numerous joints, ligaments and discs. This allows everything to be in place but not stabilized. To have stability in movement we need the muscles. In the neck, the most powerful muscles are behind. They are stronger but are also better placed because they jump from vertebra to vertebra achieving a harmonious hold of the entire neck.

If I am facing the ground, these muscles act like the cable of a crane that holds the vertebrae in the air and the neck is protected. If I look up, then these muscles cannot act and the vertebrae are left without this protection, in such a way that they are lowered backwards without control. When we are in this position they will suffer the joints and the discs and if the damage progresses will affect the nerves that leave the neck.

Look Up And NeckThis has repercussions in many areas. The most frequent thing is to the computer. A basic advice regarding posture to the computer is that the top edge of the screen of our computer does not exceed the level of the eyes. This is for this reason. If the screen is elevated it will force us to look upwards with the neck back. This gesture does not have to be very exaggerated, only a few degrees of neck extension seated in front of our computer daily can cause significant injuries in the medium-long term.

So far so good but there are patients who tell me: “is that I have no choice but to look up for my work”. There are professions or situations that require looking up in a sustained way such as changing a light bulb or if we have to fix a device that is high or paint a ceiling. It’s true, there are situations where we cannot seem to avoid it. Then what do we do? The first thing logically is to avoid it whenever possible. Second, the ideal is to have the head held by a hand or, failing that, resting against a surface (if both hands are occupied). In this way we replace the lack of these muscles with another form of attachment. If none of the above is possible there is a third option that is a bit complicated to explain. I am going to comment it but soon I will explain it in a video (I will add the link here as soon as it is available) so that it is better understood when seeing it live. Bringing the head back implies what we call a cervical extension. This way we look up normally. There’s another way. If we turn the head to one side and at the same time we tilt it to the opposite we can look upwards with a greater protection for the neck. Soon I will explain why this gesture is healthier. It has to do with the shape of the joints that have the cervical vertebrae. For now trust me and take care of the posture. There’s another way. If we turn the head to one side and at the same time we tilt it to the opposite we can look upwards with a greater protection for the neck. Soon I will explain why this gesture is healthier. It has to do with the shape of the joints that have the cervical vertebrae. For now trust me and take care of the posture. There’s another way. If we turn the head to one side and at the same time we tilt it to the opposite we can look upwards with a greater protection for the neck. Soon I will explain why this gesture is healthier. It has to do with the shape of the joints that have the cervical vertebrae. For now trust me and take care of the posture.

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Post Author: Lisa

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